9-Year-Old Finds Rare Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil At least 3.5 Million Years Old on Maryland Beach

A 9-year-old Maryland girl came across the discovery of her life while visiting a local beach this month.

As young Molly Sampson walked the waters of Calvert Beach on Christmas Day, something caught her eye—a large, dark tooth.

The palm-sized tooth turned out to belong to an animal that died out at least 3.5 million years ago: the Otodus megalodon shark.

“He told me that when he saw him, he was walking in knee-deep water and diving to pick him up,” his mother, Alicia, told CBS News. She “She said she got her arms completely wet, but it was worth it, she.”

Of her daughter, she added, “The only thing Molly really wanted for Christmas was insulated chest birds because she knew she was missing out on some good fossil finds further out in the water.” “As soon as they finished their breakfast, they put on their bird boots as fast as they could and set off for the cliffs with my husband, Bruce.”

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9-Year-Old Girl Finds Giant Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil

9-Year-Old Girl Finds Giant Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil

Calvert Maritime Museum/facebook

Alicia said Molly hoped to find “meg,” the nickname for a megalodon fossil.

“For whatever reason, he said it on Christmas morning,” she said.

The family took the fossil Molly found to the Calvert Maritime Museum to confirm it was what they thought it was.

9-Year-Old Girl Finds Giant Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil

9-Year-Old Girl Finds Giant Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil

Calvert Maritime Museum/facebook

“As future paleontologist Molly was searching for fossils on Christmas morning, her intriguing eyes popped up… but a huge Megalodon tooth!” wrote on the museum Facebook page.

“Molly was excited to share her amazing discovery with our paleontology department at the museum last week!” reads text. “We love seeing and hearing about the treasures you find along the coast.”

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Stephen Godfrey, a curator of paleontology at the museum, said the fossil belonged to a long-extinct shark species that once roamed the waters and was “one of the largest, if not the largest, marine macropredators the world has ever known.” Just reported.

Godfrey also noted that the fossil is from the left side of the upper jaw, adding that the size of the tooth indicates that the shark, considered by scientists to be a “transoceanic superpredator”, was probably between 45 and 45 years old, according to CBS News. 50 feet long.

“He was really impressed with them,” Molly’s mother said of her daughter’s love of fossils.

Godfrey told CBS News that Molly’s rare discovery was a “once in a lifetime” discovery. “People shouldn’t get the impression that teeth like this are common in Calvert Cliffs,” he said.

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